Vulnerabilities: applying All Our Health (2022)

Vulnerabilities: applying All Our Health (1)

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This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vulnerabilities-applying-all-our-health/vulnerabilities-applying-all-our-health

The Public Health England team leading this policy transitioned into the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities (OHID) on 1 October 2021.

Introduction

This guide is part of All Our Health, a resource which helps health professionals provide better access to health and care, and promote wellbeing as part of their everyday practice. The information below will help front line health and care staff use their trusted relationships with patients, families and communities to address the impact of vulnerabilities. We recognise that health and care staff as individuals may also experience similar issues in their personal lives.

This guide also recommends important actions that managers and staff holding strategic roles can take.

View the full range of All Our Health topics.

The meaning of vulnerability and other terms

To aid the understanding of this guidance we have defined some of the terms used.

Vulnerability

Being vulnerable is defined as in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, risk of abuse or neglect.

Childhood vulnerability

There is no commonly used definition of childhood vulnerability. A child can be vulnerable to risks and poor outcomes due to individual characteristics, the impact of action or inaction by other people and their physical and social environment.

Vulnerable adults

The NHS defines vulnerable adults as any adult (person over the age of 18) unable to take care of themselves or protect themselves from exploitation.

Many factors can influence adult vulnerability, experiences of vulnerability in childhood may negatively impact adults in later life – particularly if someone has fewer protective factors in place, such as a supportive family or a stable household income.

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Vulnerable background

Children and young people’s physical, emotional and mental wellbeing are significantly shaped by the social determinants of health into which they are born, live, learn and grow. Traumatic events and adverse circumstances occurring in childhood are associated with long-term impact on outcomes at population level. This does not mean that every child experiencing trauma and adversity will experience poorer outcomes. Multiple factors influence outcomes – the presence of protective factors such as a supportive family will also be key influences.

Protective and risk factors

A protective factor is something that decreases the potential harmful effect of a risk factor.

Risk factors can increase the likelihood that a person may become vulnerable, however they may be a contributing factor and not necessarily a direct cause. Risk factors are not determinative and not everyone who is identified as at risk become vulnerable.

Risk and protective factors can be found in every area of a child or adolescent’s life, exerting different effects at different stages of development.

There is a complex interrelationship between the experiences an individual child has in a family and those they experience in the wider community. Negative experiences – both at home and in the community – may mean that children are not only at greater risk of poorer outcomes because of these experiences, but also of engaging in harmful activities as they grow up which increase their risks further. This can perpetuate inequality throughout life and from one generation to the next. It emphasises the importance of addressing the risk factors which make children more vulnerable at an individual level, but also in terms of the causes of wider risk factors in families and within a community.

Trauma

Trauma results from an event, series of events or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful, or life threatening. This has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional or spiritual wellbeing.

Re-traumatisation

Re-traumatisation is the re-experiencing of thoughts, feelings or sensations experienced at the time of a traumatic event or circumstance in a person’s past. Re-traumatisation is generally triggered by reminders of previous trauma which may or may not be potentially traumatic themselves.

Trauma informed practice

Trauma informed practice is an approach which is grounded in the understanding that trauma exposure can impact an individual’s neurological, biological, psychological and social development – thus shaping a person’s world view and relationship development.

Being trauma informed means assuming that people are more likely than not to have a history of traumatic experiences, and that these experiences may impact on their ability to feel safe within or develop trusting relationships with services and their staff.

Trauma informed practice is not designed to treat trauma related difficulties. It seeks to address the barriers that those affected by trauma can experience when accessing care and services by using the six principles of trauma informed practice:

  • safety
  • trust
  • choice
  • collaboration
  • empowerment
  • cultural consideration

Addressing vulnerabilities in professional practice

Vulnerability, traumatic experiences, and wider inequalities can impact on people’s health and wellbeing from childhood and across the life course. As health and care professionals, having an awareness that this impact is not always visible and understanding how best to support individuals accessing services who may be vulnerable, will enable care to be provided that is accessible, appropriate and effective.

Many definitions of vulnerability and vulnerable populations already exist with differing perspectives or contexts depending on the setting and experiences. Groups and individuals may be impacted by multiple vulnerabilities. Vulnerability may be temporal in nature, so specific populations may be at greater risk of poor health outcomes in times of crisis. Vulnerability is complex and multifaceted – addressing vulnerabilities requires an approach that reflects this dynamic.

This section of the guidance promotes an understanding of vulnerabilities and their effects across the life course. The approach considers both the adversities people experience and factors likely to make them more vulnerable to poor outcomes.

The impact of vulnerability

The cost of late intervention is estimated at £16.6 billion a year. While not all late intervention is avoidable, there are considerable resources being spent tackling issues that could have been dealt with sooner, and at less cost to the individual and to services. Some social determinants of health make people more vulnerable – addressing these factors should also reduce health inequalities more generally.

A lack of awareness about the impact of vulnerability can lead to:

  • social exclusion
  • a lack of support or onward referral
  • the potential for re-traumatisation

There can be a link between the experience of trauma, sometimes from childhood, and the risk of a range of poor outcomes.

Vulnerability is complex and multifaceted, below are examples of some of the impacts vulnerability can have on an individual:

  • more likely to have lower educational attainment
  • poor mental and physical health outcomes
  • 4 times more likely to have special educational needs (SEN) than child population overall
  • more likely to become teenage parents
  • association between children in care and offending
  • isolation and loneliness
  • more likely not to be in education, employment or training
  • more likely to live in poverty and experience developmental delays
  • more likely to have communication difficulties
  • youth custody disproportional health needs (mental health, alcohol, and learning disability (LD)
  • witnessing violence – increased risk smoking, obesity, depression and sexual behaviour
  • housing – poor respiratory and mental health

The presence of protective factors can make an individual less likely to experience poor outcomes, even when risk factors are present. When seeking to reduce the number of individuals experiencing the harmful effects of vulnerable circumstances or trauma, interventions need to consider building protective factors as well as reducing risk factors.

Vulnerabilities have become an even more important consideration in professional practice since COVID-19, as it has highlighted existing inequalities as well as having widespread economic and social impacts. Those who were not previously identified as vulnerable, may have become so as a result of the pandemic. Increased levels of loneliness, social isolation and reduced personal resilience have impacted young people and older adults, as well as the wider population. More generally, the underlying wider community and social conditions which can make at risk groups more vulnerable, which existed before the pandemic, are likely to remain.

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Addressing vulnerabilities

By adopting a life course approach, we can:

  • prevent vulnerability and adverse experiences
  • intervene early when vulnerabilities arise
  • mitigate the negative impact of these circumstances throughout the life course by creating a healthy and supportive environment

Intervention should be based on place and address the social determinants which create health inequalities.

Individuals will process traumatic events in different ways as a result of the interaction between their own neurobiology, previous experiences of trauma and the type of support available to them, as well as the broader social context in which they live.

Risk and protective factors

Risk and protective factors may be found at an individual, family or environment level and can change over time depending on factors such as age. These factors are at the core of prevention strategies.

Risk factors: individual

Risk factors in individuals include:

  • genetic or biological
  • perinatal trauma
  • early malnutrition
  • behavioural and learning difficulties
  • alcohol and substance misuse
  • traumatic brain injury
  • gender

Risk factors: relationship

Risk factors in relationships include:

  • low family income
  • poor parenting and inconstant discipline
  • family size
  • abuse – emotional, physical or sexual
  • emotional or physical neglect
  • household alcohol or substance misuse
  • household mental health
  • family violence
  • family breakdown
  • household offending behaviour

Risk factors in communities include:

  • unsafe or violent communities
  • low social integration and poor social mobility
  • lack of possibility for recreation
  • lack of infrastructure for the satisfactions of needs and interest of young people

Risk factors: society

Risk factors in societies include:

  • socio-economically deprived communities
  • high unemployment
  • homelessness or poor housing
  • a culture of violence, norms and values which accept, normalise and glorify violence
  • discrimination
  • difficulties accessing services

Protective factors: individual

Protective factors in individuals include:

  • healthy problem solving and emotional regulation skills
  • school readiness
  • good communication skills
  • healthy social relationships

Protective factors: relationship

Protective factors in relationships include:

  • stable home environments
  • nurturing and responsive relationships
  • strong and consistent parenting
  • frequent shared activities with parents
  • financial security and economic opportunities

Protective factors in communities include:

  • a sense of belonging and connectedness
  • safe community environments
  • community cohesion
  • opportunities for sports and hobbies

Protective factors: society

Protective factors in societies include:

  • good housing
  • high standards of living
  • opportunities for valued social roles

Resilience is the capacity to bounce back from adversity – protective factors increase resilience, whereas risk factors increase vulnerability.

Resilient individuals, families and communities are more able to deal with difficulties and adversities than those with less resilience. It is important that resilience is strengthened at both an individual and societal level.

The purpose of trauma informed practices

There has been growing interest around trauma informed practices as an approach to mitigate the barriers that those affected by trauma can experience when accessing care and services.

Trauma informed practice aims to create safety for people accessing services by understanding the effects of trauma and its close links to health and behaviour. It is not about eliciting or treating people’s trauma, but about creating a safe space that enables people to access the services they need for their health and wellbeing. By adopting this approach with everyone accessing health and care services, professionals will enhance access for all – most notably for those who may find it more difficult to get the support they need.

Core principles for health and care professionals

When working to address the impact of vulnerabilities, all health and care professionals should:

  • understand specific activities and interventions that can address the impact of vulnerabilities
  • think about the resources and services available in your area that can help people who are vulnerable or have experienced trauma
  • understand the principles of trauma informed practice

Taking action

This section of the guide sets out how strategic leaders, managers and clinicians can adopt a public health informed approach to reduce inequalities and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for the most vulnerable in our communities.

The aim is to think about what has happened to a person instead of what is wrong, and understand how trauma might impact how a person responds to you and others and why they make the decisions they do.

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Applying the principles of trauma informed practice can help you to build a trusting relationship with someone accessing your services.

Principles of trauma informed practice

Consider applying the principles of trauma informed practice.

Safety

The list below includes ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • put measures in place so that individuals feel emotionally and physically safe
  • consider the wider impact of your actions
  • ask what they need to feel safe and how you can create a safe environment for them
  • keep the person informed
  • do what you say you will do when you say you will do it

Trustworthiness

The list below includes ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • be transparent and do what you say you will do
  • explain what will happen next
  • give relaxed, unhurried attention – listen effectively
  • not overpromise – always manage expectations

Choice

The list below includes ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • listen to what the person wants
  • if there is a choice – give it
  • always explain clearly and transparently what will happen next
  • validate any concerns as understandable and normal

Collaboration

The list below are ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • ask what they need
  • be clear about what will happen and what they have control over and choice in – empower them where possible
  • understand local services and support agencies so that you can suggest places to go to access help

Empowerment

The list below are ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • validate people’s feelings and engage with them in a non-judgemental manner
  • listen to what they need and ensure they are signposted or referred to appropriate support
  • not take over – encourage and empower people to take positive action themselves (with your support if they want it)

Cultural consideration

The list below are ways to apply this principle – you should:

  • open non-judgemental attitude
  • have an awareness of your own cultural values and an awareness and acceptance of cultural differences
  • consider how you can expand your own cultural awareness – familiarise with the worldviews of cultural groups other than your own
  • ask people about their culture to understand their preferred language, how healthcare decisions are made in their family and whether their culture prohibits any healthcare procedure or tests

Training

Psychological First Aid (PFA) is a globally recommended training for supporting people during crisis and emergency situations. These 2 courses equip staff, volunteers and community members to provide practical and emotional support, as well as recognising people at risk of distress:

Supervision

Staff members should consider their own wellbeing and need for support, including accessing supervision where available.

Team leaders or managers

Having an awareness of vulnerabilities when providing healthcare is about more than access to health or care. It is about considering the wider determinants of health, and shaping services which focus on improving the health of those who face the greatest disadvantage and are at higher risk of poor outcomes over the life course.

As a team leader or manager you should:

  • be aware of how health inequalities impact on people’s lived experience
  • build protective factors and promote resilience where possible
  • be open to consider how certain practices and policies may unintentionally increase harm – particularly to those who have experienced trauma and discrimination and take action to change these
  • create a working culture which is respectful and inclusive of people’s diverse life histories and models to staff – an approach which is followed through in their work with individuals
  • identify staff learning and development needs in relation to vulnerabilities and trauma informed practice – provide access to appropriate training
  • provide a psychologically safe environment for staff by ensuring adequate supervision is available
  • consider your own wellbeing and need for support, including accessing supervision where available

Senior or strategic leaders

To shape service provision to be as accessible as possible to those at greatest disadvantage in the local population, senior or strategic leaders should:

  • engage in full partnership – working to achieve the best outcome for the vulnerable child or adult
  • embed a person centred engagement and risk management approach
  • understand the wider health and wellbeing needs of your local population using the fingertips tool or other available data
  • invest in workforce development and training to embed a system of trauma informed practice
  • consider your own wellbeing and need for support, including accessing supervision where available

Understand local needs

A good understanding of needs and assets within the local area is important to develop responses and identify who might benefit from these approaches, including:

Health professionals are in a good position to engage with their communities and other stakeholders to learn about what is happening locally, and develop good knowledge of local services and other community assets.

Specific data sets relating to risk factors, protective factors and outcomes are available on fingertips – a large public health data collection.

Measuring impact

As a health and care professional, there are a range of reasons why it makes sense to measure your impact and demonstrate the value of your contribution. This could be about sharing what has worked well in order to benefit your colleagues and local people, or help you with your professional development.

The Everyday Interactions Measuring Impact Toolkit provides a straightforward and easy way for health care professionals to record and measure their public health impact in a uniform and comparable way.

The evaluation in health and wellbeing page provides a helpful overview of what evaluation is, when it should be undertaken and the different types of evaluation.

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The Child Health Profiles and Public Health Outcomes Framework also include a number of indicators related to county lines exploitation, such as:

  • 16 and 17 year olds not in education, employment or training (NEET)
  • school absence and exclusion
  • first time entrants to the youth justice system
  • children in low income households
  • children in care
  • emotional wellbeing of children in care
  • substance and drug misuse
  • children with social, emotional and mental health needs
  • violent crime – including sexual violence

Further reading, resources and good practice

Advice for individuals and members of the public

Better Health is a nationwide programme that motivates and supports adults to take action to improve their mental and physical health – including helping them to eat well, move more and quit smoking.

Every Mind Matters is a national campaign and NHS-endorsed digital platform which aims to equip young people and adults to take simple steps to look after their mental health, improve their mental wellbeing and support others to do so.

NHS UK is the UK’s biggest health information service which provides advice, tips and tools to help you make the best choices about your health and wellbeing.

Hourglass is a national charity with a mission to end the harm of older people in the UK.

There are a number of resources and tools available for health and care professionals.

ACE’s online learning has beencommissioned by the West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner, and is funded through the Home Office early intervention youth fund.

Barnardo’s is a non-profit organisation that provides support to children and young people against abuse and exploitation.

An op-ed on elder abuse in the UK provides insight into the public health problem in the UK.

NHS England have developed a good practice guide to support implementation of trauma informed care in the perinatal period.

No child left behind is a public health informed approach focused on improving outcomes for vulnerable children.

Preconception care resources provides information, intelligence and tools with evidence based approaches for how preconception care can be embedded.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) trauma and justice initiative have developed a concept of trauma and guidance for a trauma informed approach to develop a shared understanding of these concepts that would be acceptable and appropriate across an array of service systems and stakeholder groups.

White Ribbon UK is the leading charity engaging with men and boys to end violence against women – they provide reports and resources on tackling violence.

Women’s Aid is the national charity working to end domestic abuse against women and children, providing resources and support for survivors of domestic abuse and those seeking refuge.

E-learning

Health Education England resources include:

Making Every Contact Count (MECC) brief intervention training ensures that individuals havethe skills, knowledge and confidence to make every contact count.

MindEd have developed an adverse childhood experience e-learning programme for professionals and volunteers.

Best practice examples

Blackpool Better Start developed a good practice guide to support the implementation of trauma informed care in the perinatal period for all staff working with perinatal women in maternity and mental health services, although it may be more pertinent to certain roles.

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The Family Nurse Partnership blog page includes various posts on mental health, child development, domestic violence and more.

The World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Public Health Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions published a number of case studies and good practice examples.

FAQs

What are health vulnerabilities? ›

Vulnerability can arise as a result of a mismatch between the characteristics of patients and physicians, the healthcare system, the treatment, or the communication between physicians and patients. Vulnerability appears as a gap between a patient's needs and the means intended to meet them.

What are the 4 main types of vulnerability in healthcare? ›

Vulnerability in the dictionary: physical, emotional, cognitive.

How does vulnerability impact on health? ›

The experience of vulnerability creates stress and anxiety which affects physiological, psychological and social functioning. Although everyone is vulnerable at different times in his or her life, some individuals are more likely to develop health problems than others.

What does it mean to be vulnerable in health and social care? ›

Being vulnerable is defined as in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, risk of abuse or neglect.

What makes a person vulnerable? ›

What is a vulnerable adult? The definition is wide, however this may be regarded as anyone over the age of 18 years who may be unable to protect themselves from abuse, harm or exploitation, which may be by reason of illness, age, mental illness, disability or other types of physical or mental impairment.

Who is vulnerable patient? ›

Vulnerable populations include patients who are racial or ethnic minorities, children, elderly, socioeconomically disadvantaged, underinsured or those with certain medical conditions. Members of vulnerable populations often have health conditions that are exacerbated by unnecessarily inadequate healthcare.

How do you take care of vulnerable patients? ›

5 strategies to manage vulnerable patient populations
  1. Understand their needs.
  2. Partner/network with other community resources.
  3. Match needs to services.
  4. Execute safe transitions.
  5. Determine post-discharge steps for care.

How can we help vulnerable populations in healthcare? ›

Steps to Reducing Risks to Vulnerable Populations
  1. Improve social determinates to promote healthy living. ...
  2. Utilize a global budgeting national healthcare system. ...
  3. Provide access to virtual healthcare. ...
  4. Match hospitalization needs to surrounding communities. ...
  5. Support community-appropriate healthcare access.

Why is vulnerability important in nursing? ›

Vulnerability shows itself in feeling overwhelmed and losing bodily control. Vulnerability is closely related to professional insecurity, i.e. situations where nurses doubt their own knowledge and competences, or when they feel unable to treat a patient in the best way.

What is the concept of vulnerability? ›

Vulnerability is the inability to resist a hazard or to respond when a disaster has occurred. For instance, people who live on plains are more vulnerable to floods than people who live higher up.

Who is vulnerable in society? ›

This term is applied to groups of people (children, pregnant women, elderly people, malnourished people, prisoners, migrants and refugees, people who uses drugs, and people who are ill or immunocompromized, etc.)

What is cognitive vulnerability in health and social care? ›

a set of beliefs or attitudes thought to make a person vulnerable to emotional disorders such as depression and anxiety. Examples include perfectionism, dependence, and sociotropy.

What is an example of vulnerable? ›

The definition of vulnerable is easily hurt or delicate. An example of vulnerable is an animal with no protection from its prey. An example of vulnerable is a person who is easily hurt by criticism at work. An example of vulnerable is a military base with limited defenses.

How can you tell if someone is vulnerable? ›

Other signs of a vulnerability may include:
  1. Extreme moods.
  2. Poor concentration or finding it hard to make a decision.
  3. Feeling overwhelmed by things.
  4. Being tearful or emotional.
16 Jul 2021

How can we help vulnerable adults? ›

Help from social services and charities
  1. Telephone helplines and forums. ...
  2. Getting a needs assessment. ...
  3. Care and support plans. ...
  4. Financial assessment (means test) ...
  5. Someone to speak up for you (advocate) ...
  6. Care for people with mental health problems (Care Programme Approach) ...
  7. Abuse and neglect of vulnerable adults.

Why being vulnerable is important? ›

Being vulnerable can help us to work through our emotions easier (rather than pushing them away). Vulnerability fosters good emotional and mental health. Vulnerability also is a sign of courage. We become more resilient and brave when we embrace who we truly are and what we are feeling.

How can I be vulnerable with myself? ›

Tips to Be More Vulnerable
  1. Give yourself compassion. Remind yourself of how brave you are to be vulnerable, no matter how small it seems at the moment. ...
  2. Avoid focusing on other people's opinions of you. ...
  3. Slow down if you need to. ...
  4. Give up perfection. ...
  5. Be forthcoming with your needs. ...
  6. Vocalize your feelings. ...
  7. Be in the moment.
25 Aug 2021

What is vulnerability and types of vulnerability? ›

Vulnerability describes the characteristics and circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible to the damaging effects of a hazard. There are many aspects of vulnerability, arising from various physical, social, economic, and environmental factors.

What is the synonym for vulnerable? ›

In this page you can discover 35 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for vulnerable, like: unprotected, defenseless, insecure, helpless, weak, prone, assailable, susceptive, at-risk, unsafe and damaging.

What is the most vulnerable population? ›

Here are just 5 vulnerable populations who experience greater risk factors, worse access to care, and increased morbidity and mortality compared with the general population.
  1. Chronically ill and disabled. ...
  2. Low-income and/or homeless individuals. ...
  3. Certain geographical communities. ...
  4. LGBTQ+ population. ...
  5. The very young and very old.
20 Jul 2018

What is the role of the professional nurse when working with vulnerable individuals and/or population? ›

They translate and articulate the health and illness experiences of diverse, often vulnerable individuals and families in the population to health planners and policy makers, and assist members of the community to voice their problems and aspirations.

What is a vulnerable customer policy? ›

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) defines a vulnerable customer as “someone who, due to their personal circumstances, is especially susceptible to detriment, particularly when a firm is not acting with appropriate levels of care.”

What is patient rights and responsibilities? ›

Receive necessary care, regardless of your race, gender, language, origin or source of payment. • Be respected for your cultural, spiritual and personal values, dignity, beliefs and preferences. • Privacy during care, examination, treatment and conversations with your physician and other health care providers.

What are the problems faced by the vulnerable communities? ›

Challenges faced by older people include: lack of access to regular income, work and health care; declining physical and mental capacities; and dependency within the household (Sepulveda, 2010). Without income or work, older people tend to depend on others for their survival.

Why should we focus on vulnerable populations in healthcare? ›

Exposing vulnerable populations—who are at greater risk for poor outcomes than the general population—to low-value care magnifies the risks that these populations already encounter in the health care system or community.

How do you protect vulnerable groups in research? ›

providing appropriate information to elicit freely-given informed consent for participation as well as information regarding data deposit and data re-use (where deposit is possible) limits to confidentiality and occasions where this may occur.

What does the word vulnerable mean in the context of the passage? ›

1 : capable of being physically or emotionally wounded. 2 : open to attack or damage : assailable vulnerable to criticism.

What is vulnerability according to authors? ›

on the review of literature, vulnerability may be defined as: a. state of dynamic openness and opportunity for individuals, groups, communities, or populations to respond to community. and individual factors through the use of internal and external. resources in a positive (resilient) or negative (risk) manner.

How does Safe Harbor nursing work? ›

The law allows a nurse to reject an assignment on the basis of the nurse's assessment of his or her education, knowledge, competence, or experience and the nurse's immediate assessment of the risk for patient safety, or violation of the Nurse Practice Act or Board of Nursing rules.

Which statement does best describe vulnerability? ›

Which statement best describes vulnerability? Vulnerability can cause the loss of life or injury, property damage.

What is vulnerability and risk? ›

Vulnerability refers to a weakness in your hardware, software, or procedures. (In other words, it's a way hackers could easily find their way into your system.) And risk refers to the potential for lost, damaged, or destroyed assets.

What is the example of social vulnerability? ›

A number of factors, including poverty, lack of access to transportation, and crowded housing may weaken a community's ability to prevent human suffering and financial loss in the event of disaster. These factors are known as social vulnerability.

Who are these vulnerable people who need protection? ›

Explanation: Answer: Vulnerable people who needs to be protected in unorganised sector in urban and rural areas : (i) Agricultural labourers who do not have their own land and work on other people lands , small and marginal farmers and people doing small works like weavers , blacksmiths , carpenters etc.

What is vulnerability in social protection? ›

Vulnerability is defined as “the situation with a substantial downturn in the wellbeing of people or substantial threatening of their daily lives because of their inability to deal with risks when they face threats”.

How important is knowing the elements vulnerable to disaster? ›

Assessing the vulnerability of the built environment to hazards is extremely important in assessing potential consequences of an event and for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into the local development planning process.

What is an example of psychological vulnerability? ›

Psychological Vulnerability

Poor self-concept and dysfunctional beliefs can also make us psychologically vulnerable. Research has shown psychological vulnerability is indeed related to psychopathology. For example, low self-esteem makes one vulnerable to depression (Andrews & Brown, 1993).

What makes individuals more vulnerable to abuse? ›

Risk factors for abuse

Lack of mental capacity. Increasing age. Being physically dependent on others. Low self-esteem.

What are psychological vulnerabilities? ›

A psychological vulnerability in cognitive psychology is an erroneous belief, cognitive bias, or pattern of thought that predisposes an individual to psychological problems. The vulnerability exists before the symptoms of a psychological disorder appear.

What are the 4 main types of vulnerability? ›

The different types of vulnerability

In the table below four different types of vulnerability have been identified, Human-social, Physical, Economic and Environmental and their associated direct and indirect losses.

What are vulnerabilities explain and give at least 2 examples? ›

Below are some examples of vulnerability: A weakness in a firewall that can lead to malicious hackers getting into a computer network. Lack of security cameras. Unlocked doors at businesses.

What are threats and vulnerabilities explain with examples? ›

A threat and a vulnerability are not one and the same. A threat is a person or event that has the potential for impacting a valuable resource in a negative manner. A vulnerability is that quality of a resource or its environment that allows the threat to be realized. An armed bank robber is an example of a threat.

What means vulnerable person? ›

A vulnerable person can be defined as someone who belongs to a group within society that is either oppressed or more susceptible to harm. Eagly describes vulnerable persons as persons belonging to populations such as children, senior citizens, low income workers, and asylum seekers.

What is meant by the term vulnerable person? ›

"Vulnerable Person" means: (a) a Child or Children; or. (b) an individual aged 18 years and above who is or may be unable to take care of themselves, or is unable to protect themselves against harm or exploitation by reason of age, illness, trauma or disability, or any other reason.

What is vulnerable in health and social care? ›

Being vulnerable is defined as in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, risk of abuse or neglect.

How can vulnerable adults be prevented from abuse? ›

How to prevent abuse in vulnerable adults
  1. Keep an eye out for family, friends, and neighbours who may be vulnerable.
  2. Understand that abuse can happen to anyone although some people may be very good at hiding signs of abuse.
  3. If a person's isolation is an issue, discuss with them ways you might be able to help limit it.

How do you respond to concerns about abuse and neglect in health and social care? ›

Responding to concerns raised by members of the public
  1. make a referral to local authority children's social care.
  2. make a referral to the lead practitioner, if the case is open and there is one.
  3. make a referral to a specialist agency or professional e.g. educational psychology or a speech and language therapist.

What should you do if you have concerns that someone is being harmed abused or neglected? ›

You can pass on your concerns to the person's GP and social worker. Local authorities have social workers who deal specifically with cases of abuse and neglect. Call the person's local council and ask for the adult safeguarding co-ordinator. You can also speak to the police about the situation.

What is the concept of vulnerability? ›

Vulnerability is the inability to resist a hazard or to respond when a disaster has occurred. For instance, people who live on plains are more vulnerable to floods than people who live higher up.

What is cognitive vulnerability in health and social care? ›

a set of beliefs or attitudes thought to make a person vulnerable to emotional disorders such as depression and anxiety. Examples include perfectionism, dependence, and sociotropy.

What are two vulnerable populations? ›

5 Vulnerable Populations in Healthcare
  • Chronically ill and disabled. ...
  • Low-income and/or homeless individuals. ...
  • Certain geographical communities. ...
  • LGBTQ+ population. ...
  • The very young and very old.
20 Jul 2018

What are vulnerable and underserved populations? ›

The term vulnerable is often used interchangeably with underserved. While underserved consumers have limited access to health care services, vulnerable consumers tend to experience additional barriers to getting care.

What is an example of vulnerability? ›

Examples of vulnerability

Telling others when they've done something to upset you. Sharing with someone something personal about yourself that you would normally hold back. Having the willingness to feel pride or shame. Reaching out to someone you haven't talked to in a while and would like to reconnect with.

What is another word for vulnerability? ›

In this page you can discover 14 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for vulnerability, like: intrusion, exposure, threat, liability, openness, invulnerability, zero-day, susceptibility, vulnerableness, susceptibleness and risk.

What are types of vulnerability? ›

Types of vulnerability include social, cognitive, environmental, emotional or military. In relation to hazards and disasters, vulnerability is a concept that links the relationship that people have with their environment to social forces and institutions and the cultural values that sustain and contest them.

What is an example of psychological vulnerability? ›

Psychological Vulnerability

Poor self-concept and dysfunctional beliefs can also make us psychologically vulnerable. Research has shown psychological vulnerability is indeed related to psychopathology. For example, low self-esteem makes one vulnerable to depression (Andrews & Brown, 1993).

How do you take care of vulnerable patients? ›

5 strategies to manage vulnerable patient populations
  1. Understand their needs.
  2. Partner/network with other community resources.
  3. Match needs to services.
  4. Execute safe transitions.
  5. Determine post-discharge steps for care.

What makes individuals more vulnerable to abuse? ›

Risk factors for abuse

Lack of mental capacity. Increasing age. Being physically dependent on others. Low self-esteem.

Why is vulnerability important in social work? ›

It allows the other person to also be more real. To share their true feelings about something, instead of skirting around an issue. By opening up my own self to vulnerability, it gives the other person permission to be vulnerable as well.

What is mean by vulnerable group? ›

A vulnerable group can be defined as a “population within a country that has specific characteristics that make it at a higher risk of needing humanitarian assistance than others or being excluded from financial and social services.

What are the problems faced by the vulnerable communities? ›

Challenges faced by older people include: lack of access to regular income, work and health care; declining physical and mental capacities; and dependency within the household (Sepulveda, 2010). Without income or work, older people tend to depend on others for their survival.

Who are the most vulnerable to disaster? ›

One measure of the strength of a community's response and recovery system is its attentiveness to its most vulnerable citizens–children, the frail elderly, the disabled, and the impoverished and disenfranchised. It is a cruel fact: disasters discriminate.

What are some barriers to healthcare for vulnerable populations? ›

This summary will discuss barriers to health care such as lack of health insurance, poor access to transportation, and limited health care resources, with a special focus on how these barriers impact under-resourced communities.

Why should a society care for its most poor and vulnerable communities? ›

A civilized, modern society must care for its most vulnerable people not only because it's the morally right thing to do, but because the cost of not doing so would be far greater to our society and economy.

Videos

1. Vulnerable self: are your microvita the master keys?
(Pratik S)
2. How To - Vulnerability Response
(ServiceNow - Now Community)
3. This Guide Will CHANGE YOUR LIFE! *Not Clickbait* - League of Legends
(Skill Capped Challenger LoL Guides)
4. Why can't your body handle a punch to the liver? - Human Anatomy | Kenhub
(Kenhub - Learn Human Anatomy)
5. How To Fix Your RELATIONSHIPS In Order To Fix Your HEALTH! | Mia Lux
(Mark Hyman, MD)
6. Austerity and Vulnerability - '3 Smart Questions' with Dr Anila Dias Bandaranaike
(Centre for a Smart Future)

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